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If you choose to stay at home during a hurricane, here are some tips for saying safe:

 

Hurricanes are not just a coastal problem.  In fact, their impacts can be felt hundreds of miles inland.Unfortunately, many people are suffering from hurricane amnesia, despite the considerable impact that Hurricane Sandy had on our local area. 

Although we have not had a reoccurrence in the past 3 years, weather experts believe that 2016 may bring a serious threat of extreme weather.  The goal of these preparedness tips is to help us all to be ready when the inevitable happens.

 

We will be posting more about hurricanes every few days.

Coming next: Develop an evacuation plan

Everyone is at risk when temperatures rise above 90 degrees; and the elderly and the very young are most susceptible to heat and heat-related illnesses.

Heat-related illnesses can cause serious injury and even death if unattended. Signs of heat- related illnesses include nausea, dizziness, flushed or pale skin, heavy sweating and headaches.

Persons with heat-related illness should be moved to a cool place, given cool water to drink and ice packs or cool wet cloths should be applied to the skin. If a victim refuses water, vomits or loses consciousness, call 9-1-1 immediately.

As we head into the heart of our local hurricane season, we’ll be sharing a series of preparedness tips to help keep you and your loved ones safe should we experience another Hurricane Sandy this year.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has released its updated forecast for the 2016 Atlantic hurricane season, with the expectation that this may be the most active year for hurricanes since 2012.

 

 

 

 

  

 As a reminder, hurricanes are rated from 1 to 5 based on their intensity.  In general, the potential for damage rises by a factor of 4x for every category increase. The weather experts are forecasting up to four Category 3 hurricanes (like Sandy) this season, which can have wind speeds up to 129 mph.

We will be posting more about hurricanes every few days. 

Coming next: Determining your risk.

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