Washington Township - Where Every Season is Our Best Season

Long Valley's Non-Native Species


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Garlic Mustard
Garlic
Garlic
Garlic Mustard can quickly dominate the ground cover, displacing native vegetation. It is also a threat to native butterflies, whose larvae die on the plant. Because it has no natural predators, it is important to prevent its establishment.
For more Information, click on the hyperlink below.
Garlic Mustard http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/fact/mivi1.htm
 
Japanese Stiltgrass
Stiltgrass
Stiltgrass

Japanese stiltgrass, or Nepalese browntop, is an annual grass with a sprawling habit. It germinates in spring and grows slowly through the summer months, ultimately reaching heights of 2 to 3½ ft. Japanese stiltgrass is especially well adapted to low light conditions.

It threatens native plants and natural habitats in open to shady, and moist to dry locations. Stiltgrass spreads to form extensive patches, displacing native species that are not able to compete with it. Where white-tail deer are over-abundant, they may facilitate its invasion by feeding on native plant species and avoiding stiltgrass.

For more Information, click on the hyperlink below.
Japanese Stiltgrass http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/fact/mivi1.htm
 
Japanese Knotweed
Knotweed
Knotweed Jan Samanek, State Phytosanitary Administration, Czechia
Japanese knotweed is an upright, shrublike, herbaceous perennial that can grow to over 10 feet in height. Japanese knotweed spreads quickly to form dense thickets that exclude native vegetation and greatly alter natural ecosystems.
For more Information, click on the hyperlink below.
Japanese Knotweed http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/fact/pocu1.htm
 
Porcelainberry
Porcelain
Porcelain

Porcelain-berry is a deciduous, woody, perennial vine. The stem pith of porcelain-berry is white (grape is brown) and continuous across the nodes (grape is not), the bark has lenticels (grape does not), and the bark does not peel (grape bark peels or shreds).

Porcelain-berry is a vigorous invader of open and wooded habitats. As it spreads, it climbs over shrubs and other vegetation, shading out native plants and consuming habitat.

For more Information, click on the hyperlink below.
Porcelainberry http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/fact/ambr1.htm
 
Japanese Honeysuckle
Troy Evans, Bugwood.org
Troy Evans, Bugwood.org

Japanese honeysuckle is a perennial vine that climbs by twisting its stems around vertical structures, including limbs and trunks of shrubs and small trees.

In North America, Japanese honeysuckle has few natural enemies which allows it to spread widely and out-compete native plant species. Shrubs and young trees can be killed by girdling when vines twist tightly around stems and trunks, cutting off the flow of water through the plant.

For more Information, click on the hyperlink below.
Japanese Honeysuckle http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/fact/loja1.htm
 
Oriental Bittersweet
Chris Evans, River to River CWMA, Bugwood.org
Chris Evans, River to River CWMA, Bugwood.org

Oriental bittersweet is a deciduous woody perennial plant which grows as a climbing vine and a trailing shrub. Stems of older plants 4 inches in diameter have been reported. There are separate female (fruiting) and male (non-fruiting) plants. The fruits are three-valved, yellow, globular capsules that at maturity split open to reveal three red-orange, fleshy arils each containing one or two seeds. The abundance of showy fruits have made Oriental bittersweet extremely popular for use in floral arrangements.

Oriental bittersweet is a vigorously growing vine that climbs over and smothers vegetation which may die from excessive shading or breakage.

For more Information, click on the hyperlink below.
Oriental Bittersweet http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/fact/ceor1.htm
 
Japanese Barberry
Barry Rice, sarracenia.com, Bugwood.org
Barry Rice, sarracenia.com, Bugwood.org

Japanese barberry is a dense, deciduous, spiny shrub that grows 2 to 8 ft. high. The branches are brown, deeply grooved, somewhat zig-zag in form and bear a single very sharp spine at each node. The fruits are bright red berries about 1/3 in (1 cm) long that are borne on narrow stalks.

Japanese barberry forms dense stands in natural habitats including canopy forests, open woodlands, wetlands, pastures, and meadows. Once established, barberry displaces native plants and reduces wildlife habitat and forage.

For more Information, click on the hyperlink below.
Japanese Barberry http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/fact/beth1.htm
 
Russian Olive
Olive
Olive

Russian-olive is a small, usually thorny shrub or small tree that can grow to 30 feet in height. At three years of age, plants begin to flower and fruit.

Russian-olive can outcompete native vegetation, interfere with natural plant succession and nutrient cycling, and tax water reserves.

For more Information, click on the hyperlink below.
Russian Olive http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/fact/elan1.htm
 
Multiflora Rose
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Smoky Mountains National Park Resource Management Archive, USDI National Park Service, Bugwood.org

Multiflora rose is a thorny, perennial shrub with arching stems (canes), and leaves divided into five to eleven sharply toothed leaflets.

Multiflora rose is extremely prolific and can form impenetrable thickets that exclude native plant species.

For more Information, click on the hyperlink below.
Multiflora Rose http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/fact/romu1.htm
 
Wineberry
Wineberry
Troy Evans,  Bugwood.org

Wineberry, or wine raspberry, is a typical species in the genus Rubus, which contains blackberry and raspberry. The very edible raspberry like fruit is bright red and ripens during June and July. Wineberry is a vigorous grower and can form dense thickets covering large areas, displacing many native plants in the process.

Wineberry poses a threat to the native plants that grow in forest, field, stream and wetland edge habitats, open woods, and savannas and prairies.

For more Information, click on the hyperlink below.
Wineberry http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/fact/ruph1.htm
 
Tree-of-Heaven
Ailanthus
Ailanthus

Tree-of-heaven, also known as ailanthus, Chinese sumac, and stinking shumac, is a rapidly growing, deciduous tree. All parts of the tree, especially the flowers, have a strong, offensive odor. Mature trees can reach 80 feet or more in height.

Tree-of-heaven is a prolific seed producer, grows rapidly, and can overrun native vegetation. Once established, it can quickly take over a site and form an impenetrable thicket. Ailanthus trees also produces toxins that prevent the establishment of other plant species. The root system is aggressive enough to cause damage to sewers and foundations.

For more Information, click on the hyperlink below.
Tree-of-Heaven http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/fact/aial1.htm
 

For Additional Information Check out http://www.invasivespeciesinfo.gov/plants/garlicmustard.shtml

Weeds Gone Wild - Additional Information Regarding Invasive Plants
http://www.weedsgonewild.org/